Earth Observation and Signal Territories: Studying U.S. Broadcast Infrastructure through Historical Network Maps, Google Earth, and Fieldwork

Lisa Parks

Abstract


This article engages with three different modes of Earth observation—historical network maps, Google Earth interfaces, and fieldwork—to develop the concept of “signal territories” and elucidate a critical approach for studying U.S. broadcast infrastructure. This approach: 1) highlights physical infrastructures—technological hardware and processes in dispersed geographic locations—as important sites for historical and critical analysis in media and communication studies; 2) explores multiple modes of infrastructure representation—ranging from cartography to phenomenology, from hand-drawn maps to digital interfaces, from circuit diagrams to site visits; and 3) foregrounds the biotechnical aspects and resource requirements of broadcast infrastructures, probing their dynamic operations and complex materialisms. Engaging with what Richard Maxwell and Toby Miller call a “materialist ecology” of media, the article explores what is at stake in understanding media infrastructures from up close and afar.

Cet article examine trois manières différentes d’observer la Terre (les cartes de réseau historiques, les interfaces Google Earth et les enquêtes sur le terrain) dans le but de développer le concept de « territoires délimités par un signal » et d’élucider une approche critique pour étudier l’infrastructure de la radiodiffusion américaine. Cette approche : 1) souligne les infrastructures physiques (les matériels et processus technologiques dans des lieux géographiques dispersés) comme étant des sites importants pour l’analyse historique et critique en études des médias et de la communication; 2) explore plusieurs sortes de représentation des infrastructures—de la cartographie à la phénoménologie, des cartes géographiques dessinées à la main aux interfaces numériques, de schémas de circuits aux visites sur place; et 3) met en avant les aspects biotechniques et les besoins en ressources des infrastructures de radiodiffusion, examinant leurs opérations dynamiques et leurs matérialismes complexes. Cet article a recours à ce que Richard Maxwell et Toby Miller appellent une « écologie matérialiste » des médias afin d’explorer ce qui est en jeu dans la compréhension à petite et à grande échelle des infrastructures médiatiques.


Keywords


Infrastructure; Broadcasting; Google Earth; Mapping; Fieldwork; Phenomenology

Full Text: PDF HTML


DOI: https://doi.org/10.22230/cjc.2013v38n3a2736

  •  Announcements
    Atom logo
    RSS2 logo
    RSS1 logo
  •  Current Issue
    Atom logo
    RSS2 logo
    RSS1 logo
  •  Thesis Abstracts
    Atom logo
    RSS2 logo
    RSS1 logo

We wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for their financial support through theAid to Scholarly Journals Program.

SSHRC LOGO