Call for Papers:  Group de recherche en communication politique

2021-06-30

 Group de recherche en communication politique

 Call for papers Canadian Journal of Communication

MEDIATIZING THE PANDEMIC International perspectives

Editors: Camila Moreira Cesar, David Dumouchel, and Thierry Giasson Political Communication Research Lab (GRCP), Université Laval (Canada) 

 ARGUMENT 

Since its outbreak in 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed the daily lives of citizens around the world. It simultaneously became a worldwide health, social, and political issue.1 

From a political perspective, the public management of the pandemic has weakened the legitimacy and authority of some national governments. Many leaders seemed unprepared and ill-equipped to react to waves and outbreaks of the pandemic. Others fare better. However, they all had to guide the transformation of individual and collective behaviors as well as supervise the establishment of new social norms in their populations.2 Many nations have also experienced an increasing circulation of conspiracist discourses and disinformation processes that have permeated public debate and endangered citizens’ lives.3 These phenomena were concurrent to a loss of public confidence in expert discourse (scientific, governmental, journalistic among others), which are of paramount importance in crisis management.4 

The pandemic is also not without effect on the routines of news organizations and on the work of journalists5, who were faced with a double mission. First, they had to inform citizens about the evolution of the pandemic, about the actions of public authorities, and about appropriate sanitary measures (such as hand-washing, mask wearing or social distancing).6 Second, they had to try to bring informative and credible journalistic content back at the center of busy information flows competing in a complex hybrid media systems7. 

Finally, the urgent health context has also made more visible the economic and political influence of big digital companies (GAFAM). These private businesses have approached several national governments to offer tracking and monitoring services developed to help fight the pandemic, which brought up economic, ethical, and legal issues associated with the use of digital tools to curb contagion.8 These digital initiatives have also raised questions regarding privacy and personal data protection. 

Just over a year after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, this special issue of the Canadian Journal of Communication (CJC) invites contributions focusing on the different dynamics of the mediatization of the pandemic. By welcoming contributions from both a Canadian and comparative perspective, the issue aims, above all, to put into perspective how the pandemic affected political communication, journalism and public discourses in different national contexts, including Canada. Interdisciplinary theoretical and methodological approaches as well as strong empirical case 

studies are strongly encouraged for submission. The selected papers will be published, in French or in English, in a special issue of the CJC in 2022. 

As part of this publication project, a workshop where selected papers will be presented and discussed is scheduled for February 2022. If sanitary regulations allow it, the event will be held in person at Université Laval, Québec City. An online alternative will be put in place otherwise. On this occasion, authors whose article proposals have been selected will be invited to present the first draft of their work. Members of the Scientific Committee will comment the papers at the workshop and help make the final selection of the papers that will be published in the dossier. 

Proposals should focus on one of the following four thematic axes:

Axis 1: Governmental and administrative discourses on the pandemic 

Work on this theme examines governmental communication during the pandemic. Proposals should study, from an analytical, critical, or reflective point of view, the forms, contents and communication strategies of governments, public institutions, national public health managers and leaders of political executives regarding sanitary measures, social regulations and guidelines presented to populations. Empirical studies on discursive, digital or visual material as well as components of public and government communication would be particularly appreciated.

Axis 2: Journalistic treatment of the pandemic 

This axis follows a double objective. On the one hand, it seeks to examine how the pandemic affected the work of information and media professionals. On the other hand, it also aims at better understanding the challenges that the latter had to overcome to make their content available to the public. Having access to reliable, verified information produced by credible news organization is essential to the fight against the pandemic. Thus, submissions that enlighten the adaptations and the transformations of journalistic practices are encouraged, both from the point of view of the investigative techniques and functioning of newsrooms, as well as the strategies for legitimizing the role and work of journalists in a context of information abundance and disinformation. 

Axis 3: Counter discourses and public debate in digital arenas 

Work on this theme analyzes the characteristics and the dynamics of communicational information phenomena arising from digital arenas during the COVID-19 pandemic. It should reflect on how digital technologies increase the visibility of discourses and counter-discourses produced outside institutional frameworks, such as governments or mainstream media. More specifically, paper submissions examining the production and circulation of discourses advocating against sanitary measures and vaccination as well as disinformation initiatives and conspiracist contents are encouraged. 

Axis 4: Pandemic, AI, and digital technologies 

This last theme focuses on debates related to the integration of artificial intelligence systems and digital tools designed to control the spread of COVID-19. It seeks to put into perspective the economic and political interests that shaped these technologies as well as their effectiveness and benefits to fight the pandemic. Proposals investigating the political, ethical, and legal issues generated by the collection, processing, and use of personal data during the pandemic are welcomed. Empirical studies backed by theoretical and critical reflection on legal, ethical, and democratic issues related to the use of digital resources will be particularly appreciated. 

SUBMISSION PROCESS 

Paper proposals must be sent in French or English at mediatisation.covid19@ulaval.ca. 

They must contain the names of the authors, a title, as well as a 400 words summary. It must present the research problem, the case(s) studied, the research questions and hypotheses, the methodology, and the expected scientific contribution. These abstracts will be evaluated by members of the Scientific Committee for the first selection of papers to be presented at the workshop in February 2022. 

PLANNED TIMETABLE 

23/06/2021: Launch of the call for contributions 

30/08/2021: Deadline to submit a paper proposal 

30/09/2021: Notification to authors of the selection or rejection of their proposal 

01/02/2022: Submission of a first draft of the paper by authors 

18-19/02/2022: Workshop at Université Laval 

04/03/2022: Notification to authors of the final selection or rejection of their paper 

15/04/2022: Submission of the revised version of the paper by authors 

22/04/2022: Submission of the selected papers to the journal’s external reviewers 

June to November 2022: final revisions of the selected papers and production of the issue 

December 2022/Beginning 2023: Publication of the journal issue 

ISSUE EDITORS 

Camila Moreira Cesar, Political Communication Research Lab, U. Laval (Canada) 

David Dumouchel, Political Communication Research Lab, U. Laval (Canada) 

Thierry Giasson, Political Communication Research Lab, U. Laval (Canada) 

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE 

Gersende Blanchard, Université de Lille, France 

Shelley Boulianne, MacEwan University, Canada 

David Dumouchel, Université Laval, Canada 

Nina Fernandes dos Santos, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Brazil 

Camila Moreira Cesar, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, France 

David Nicolas Hopmann, Syddansk Universitet, Danemark 

Nicolas Hubé, Université de Lorraine, France 

Darren Lilleker, Bournemouth University, United Kingdom 

Vincent Raynauld, Emerson College, United States 

Sandrine Roginsky, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium 

James Stanyer, Loughborough University, United Kingdom 

Jesper Strömbäck, University of Gothenburg, Sweden 

Olivier Turbide, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada 

1 See: AGARTAN, T., COOK, S. & LIN, V. (2020). Introduction: COVID-19 and WHO: Global institutions in the context of shifting multilateral and regional dynamics. Global Social Policy, 20(3), 367-373; BOBBA, G. & HUBÉ, N. (2021). Populism and the Politicization of the COVID-19 Crisis in Europe, London, Palgrave Macmillan. 

BANQUE MONDIALE. (2020). La pandémie de COVID-19 plonge l’économie planétaire dans sa pire récession depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Communiqué de presse. https://www.banquemondiale.org/fr/news/press-release/2020/06/08/covid-19-to-plunge-global-economy-into-worst-recession-since-world-war-ii 

2 HAN, Q., ZHENG, B., CRISTEA, M., AGOSTINI, M., BÉLANGER, J. J., GUTZKOW, B., KREIENKAMP, J., REITSEMA, A., A VAN BREEN, J., ABAKOUMKIN, G., … & LEANDER, N. P. (2020). Trust in government and its associations with health behaviour and prosocial behaviour during the COVID-19 pandemic. PsyArXiv. Preprint. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/p5gns 

3 BOULIANNE, S. et al (2021). La mésinformation sur les plateformes de médias sociaux et dans différents pays. Rapport Mars 2021. URL. : https://roam.macewan.ca/islandora/object/gm%3A2823. 

BERTIN, P., NERA, K. & DELOUVÉE, S. (2020). Conspiracy Beliefs, Rejection of Vaccination, and Support for hydroxychloroquine: A Conceptual Replication-Extension in the COVID-19 Pandemic Context. Frontiers in Psychology. Preprint. https://psyarxiv.com/rz78k 

BRENNEN, J. S., SIMON, F., HOWARD, P. N. & NIELSEN R. K. (2020). Types, sources, and claims of COVID-19 misinformation. Reuters Institute. Factsheet. https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/types-sources-and-claims-covid-19-misinformation#scale 

OCDE (2020). Transparence, communication et confiance: Le rôle de la communication publique pour combattre la vague de désinformation concernant le nouveau coronavirus. Rapport Juillet 2020. https://read.oecd-ilibrary.org/view/?ref=135_135223-duu3s3o3df&title=Transparence-communication-et-confiance-Le-role-de-la-communication-publique-pour-combattre-la-vague-de-desinformation-concernant-le-nouveau-coronavirus 

4 BENKLER, Y.; FARIS, R. & ROBERTS, H. (2018). Network Propaganda. Manipulation, Desinformation and Radicalization in American Politics, New York, Oxford Universitary Press. 

5 CASERO-RIPOLLÉS, A. (2020). Impact of Covid-19 on the media system. Communicative and democratic consequences of news consumption during the outbreak. El profesional de la información, v. 29, n. 2, e290223. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2020.mar.23 

POSETTI, J., BELL, E. et BROWN, P. (2020). Le journalisme et la pandémie. Un panorama mondial des impacts. Rapport élaboré par l’International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) et le Tow Center for Digital Journalism de l’Université de Columbia. https://www.icfj.org/sites/default/files/2020- 11/Journalism%20and%20the%20Pandemic%20Project%20Report%201%202020_French.pdf 

6 On this subject, see: ANWAR, A., MALIK, M., RAEES, V. & ANWAR, A. (2020). Role of Mass Media and Public Health Communications in the COVID-19 Pandemic. Cureus, 12(9), e10453. https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.10453 

7 CHADWICK, A. (2013). The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Powers, New York, Oxford University Press. 

8 TAGMATARCHI STORENG, K. & DE BENGY PUYVALLÉE, A. (2021): The Smartphone Pandemic: How Big Tech and public health authorities partner in the digital response to Covid-19, Global Public Health, DOI: 10.1080/17441692.2021.1882530 

KITCHIN, R. (2020). Civil liberties or public health, or civil liberties and public health? Using surveillance technologies to tackle the spread of COVID-19, Space and Polity, 24:3, p. 362-381, DOI: 10.1080/13562576.2020.1770587  

 

 

 Appel à contributions Canadian Journal of Communication

MÉDIATISER LA PANDÉMIE Regards internationaux

Équipe éditoriale : Camila Moreira Cesar, David Dumouchel et Thierry Giasson Groupe de recherche en communication politique, Université Laval (Canada) ARGUMENTAIRE 

 

 ARGUMENTAIRE 

Depuis son déclenchement en 2020, la pandémie de Covid-19 bouleverse les modes de vie à travers le monde, se convertissant en un événement sanitaire, social et politique tout à la fois1. 

D’un point de vue politique, la gestion de la situation sanitaire a miné la légitimité et l’autorité des gouvernements, contraints d’orienter les comportements individuels et collectifs et de gérer la mise en place d’une nouvelle normalité sociale2. À l’échelle nationale et internationale, de nombreux pays connaissent une croissance de la circulation de théories complotistes et de processus de désinformation qui nuisent au débat public et mettent en danger la vie des citoyens3. Ces phénomènes se conjuguent à une décrédibilisation du discours savant (scientifiques, gouvernementaux, journalistiques…), qui est pourtant le nerf de la guerre dans la gestion de crises des sociétés contemporaines4. 

Dans ce contexte, la situation sanitaire n’a pas été sans effet sur le fonctionnement des organes de presse et le travail des journalistes5, qui sont confrontés à une double mission. D’une part, ils doivent informer sur l’avancée de la pandémie, diffuser les actions des pouvoirs publics et prescrire les bonnes pratiques sanitaires (laver les mains, porter le masque, s’isoler, etc.) aux citoyens6. D’autre part, ils doivent replacer les contenus journalistiques au centre des flux informationnels dans un complexe système médiatique hybride7 rythmé par les dynamiques numériques. 

Enfin, ce contexte d’urgence sanitaire a aussi rendu visible le poids économique, mais aussi politique, des grandes entreprises numériques (GAFAM). Ces acteurs privés se sont rapprochés de plusieurs gouvernements pour proposer leurs services dans le combat à la pandémie, rendant visible les enjeux économiques, éthiques et juridiques associés à l’utilisation d’outils numériques visant à freiner la contagion8. Ces initiatives numériques de veille et de lutte à la pandémie ont toutefois soulevé des questionnements liés à l’intrusion dans la sphère privée des individus au nom de l’intérêt public et du bien commun. 

Un peu plus d’an après le déclenchement de la pandémie de Covid-19, ce numéro spécial de la Revue canadienne de communication (RCC) propose de revenir sur les différentes facettes de la médiatisation de la crise sanitaire afin de les comprendre et les expliquer davantage. En accueillant des travaux portant sur le Canada ou adoptant une perspective comparée internationale, ce numéro spécial vise surtout à mettre en perspective les impacts de la pandémie sur la communication politique, le journalisme et le débat public dans divers contextes nationaux, dont le Canada. Les approches théoriques et méthodologiques interdisciplinaires ainsi que des études de cas empiriques sont vivement encouragées dans les propositions d’articles soumises. Les textes sélectionnés seront publiés, en français ou en anglais, dans la Revue canadienne de communication en 2022. 

Dans le cadre de ce projet de publication, la réalisation d’un atelier consacré au thème de l’appel est prévue pour février 2022. Si les conditions sanitaires le permettent, l’événement se tiendra en présentiel à l’Université Laval. Une alternative en ligne sera mise en place autrement. À cette occasion, les auteur-e-s dont la proposition d’article aura été retenue seront invité-e-s à présenter une première version de leurs travaux. Les membres du comité scientifique commenteront les articles lors de l’atelier et participeront ensuite à la sélection définitive des articles qui seront publiés dans le numéro spécial. 

Les personnes intéressées sont invitées à soumettre une proposition qui s’inscrit dans l’un des quatre axes thématiques suivants : 

Axe 1 : Les discours gouvernementaux et administratifs sur la pandémie 

Cet axe a pour objectif d’examiner la communication gouvernementale autour de la pandémie. Il est ouvert aux propositions orientées vers l’étude, d’un point de vue analytique, critique ou réflexif, des formes, des contenus et des stratégies de communication des institutions publiques, des directions nationales de la santé publique et des dirigeants des exécutifs politiques dans la transmission des consignes et orientations à la population. Des études empiriques sur des corpus discursifs, numériques ou visuels ainsi que sur des composantes de communication publique et gouvernementale seraient particulièrement appréciées. 

Axe 2 : Le traitement journalistique de la pandémie  

Cet axe poursuit un double objectif. D’une part, il vise à interroger l’impact du contexte sanitaire sur le travail des professionnels de l’information et, plus largement, des médias. D’autre part, il cherche à comprendre les défis que ces derniers doivent surmonter à l’heure où la fiabilité et la qualité des informations diffusées s’imposent comme des enjeux centraux afin de lutter contre la pandémie. Seront ainsi accueillies des propositions qui traitent des adaptations et des transformations des pratiques journalistiques, tant du point de vue des techniques d’enquête et du fonctionnement des rédactions, que des stratégies de légitimation du rôle et du travail des journalistes dans un contexte d’abondance informationnelle. 

 Axe 3 : Les contre-discours et le débat public dans les arènes numériques 

Cet axe vise à analyser les caractéristiques et les dynamiques des phénomènes info-communicationnels issus des arènes numériques dans le contexte de la pandémie de Covid-19. Il s’agira ainsi de réfléchir à la façon dont les technologies numériques favorisent la mise en visibilité de discours et de contre-discours produits en dehors des cadres institutionnellement légitimes, tels que les parlements ou les grands médias traditionnels d’information. Plus spécifiquement, les propositions d’article abordant les dynamiques de production et de circulation de discours contestataires des mesures sanitaires, d’initiatives de désinformation ainsi que de contenus conspirationnistes sont encouragées. 

 Axe 4 : Pandémie, IA et outils numériques  

Ce dernier axe s’intéresse aux débats autour de l’intégration des systèmes d’intelligence artificielle et des outils numériques dans les mécanismes de contrôle des cas de Covid-19. Il vise à mettre en perspective les jeux d’intérêts économiques et politiques ainsi que l’efficacité et les avantages des solutions technologiques dans le domaine de la santé, tout en tenant compte des enjeux politiques, éthiques et juridiques soulevés par la collecte, le traitement et l’utilisation de données personnelles des individus. Les études empiriques adossées à une réflexion théorique et critiques sur les problématiques légales, éthiques et démocratiques liées à l’utilisation des ressources numériques seront particulièrement appréciées. 

SOUMISSION DES PROPOSITIONS 

Les propositions d’articles doivent être envoyées en français ou en anglais à mediatisation.covid19@ulaval.ca. 

Elles doivent contenir le noms des auteur.e.s, un titre, ainsi qu’un résumé de 400 mots maximum qui expose la problématique de recherche, le.s cas étudié.s, les questions et hypothèses de recherche, la méthodologie employée et la contribution scientifique attendue. Ces résumés seront évalués par le Comité scientifique pour la première sélection des articles qui seront présentés lors du colloque de février 2022. 

CALENDRIER PRÉVISIONNEL 

23/06/2021 : Lancement de l’appel à contributions 

30/08/2021 : Date limite pour la soumission d’une proposition d’article 

30/09/2021 : Notification aux auteur.e.s de l’acceptation ou refus 

01/02/2022 : Remise d’une première version de l’article par les auteur.e.s 

18-19/02/2022 : Réalisation du colloque à l’Université Laval ou en ligne 

04/03/2022 : Notification aux auteur.e.s de la sélection définitive des articles pour le numéro spécial 

15/04/2022 : Remise de l’article révisé par les auteur.e.s 

22/04/2022 : Envoi des articles aux évaluateurs externes de la revue 

Juin à novembre 2022 : Révision finale des articles sélectionnés et production du numéro 

Décembre 2022/Début 2023 : Sortie du numéro de revue 

Équipe éditoriale 

Camila Moreira Cesar, Groupe de recherche en communication politique, U. Laval (Canada) 

David Dumouchel, Groupe de recherche en communication politique, U. Laval (Canada) 

Thierry Giasson, Groupe de recherche en communication politique, U. Laval (Canada) 

COMITÉ SCIENTIFIQUE 

Gersende Blanchard, Université de Lille, France 

Shelley Boulianne, MacEwan University, Canada 

David Dumouchel, Université Laval, Canada 

Nina Fernandes dos Santos, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Brésil 

Camila Moreira Cesar, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, France 

David Nicolas Hopmann, Syddansk Universitet, Danemark 

Nicolas Hubé, Université de Lorraine, France 

Darren Lilleker, Bournemouth University, Royaume-Uni 

Vincent Raynauld, Emerson College, États-Unis 

Sandrine Roginsky, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgique 

James Stanyer, Loughborough University, Royaume-Uni 

Jesper Strömbäck, University of Gothenburg, Suède 

Olivier Turbide, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada 

1 Voir : AGARTAN, T., COOK, S. & LIN, V. (2020). Introduction: COVID-19 and WHO: Global institutions in the context of shifting multilateral and regional dynamics. Global Social Policy, 20(3), 367-373 ; BOBBA, G. et HUBÉ, N. (2021). Populism and the Politicization of the COVID-19 Crisis in Europe, London, Palgrave Macmillan. 

BANQUE MONDIALE. (2020). La pandémie de COVID-19 plonge l’économie planétaire dans sa pire récession depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Communiqué de presse. https://www.banquemondiale.org/fr/news/press-release/2020/06/08/covid-19-to-plunge-global-economy-into-worst-recession-since-world-war-ii 

2 HAN, Q., ZHENG, B., CRISTEA, M., AGOSTINI, M., BÉLANGER, J. J., GUTZKOW, B., KREIENKAMP, J., REITSEMA, A., A VAN BREEN, J., ABAKOUMKIN, G., … & LEANDER, N. P. (2020). Trust in government and its associations with health behaviour and prosocial behaviour during the COVID-19 pandemic. PsyArXiv. Preprint. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/p5gns 

3 BOULIANNE, S. et al (2021). La mésinformation sur les plateformes de médias sociaux et dans différents pays. Rapport Mars 2021. URL. : https://roam.macewan.ca/islandora/object/gm%3A2823. 

BERTIN, P., NERA, K. & DELOUVÉE, S. (2020). Conspiracy Beliefs, Rejection of Vaccination, and Support for hydroxychloroquine: A Conceptual Replication-Extension in the COVID-19 Pandemic Context. Frontiers in Psychology. Preprint. https://psyarxiv.com/rz78k 

BRENNEN, J. S., SIMON, F., HOWARD, P. N. & NIELSEN R. K. (2020). Types, sources, and claims of COVID-19 misinformation. Reuters Institute. Factsheet. https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/types-sources-and-claims-covid-19-misinformation#scale 

OCDE (2020). Transparence, communication et confiance: Le rôle de la communication publique pour combattre la vague de désinformation concernant le nouveau coronavirus. Rapport Juillet 2020. https://read.oecd-ilibrary.org/view/?ref=135_135223-duu3s3o3df&title=Transparence-communication-et-confiance-Le-role-de-la-communication-publique-pour-combattre-la-vague-de-desinformation-concernant-le-nouveau-coronavirus 

4 BENKLER, Y.; FARIS, R. & ROBERTS, H. (2018). Network Propaganda. Manipulation, Desinformation and Radicalization in American Politics, New York, Oxford Universitary Press. 

5 CASERO-RIPOLLÉS, A. (2020). Impact of Covid-19 on the media system. Communicative and democratic consequences of news consumption during the outbreak. El profesional de la información, v. 29, n. 2, e290223. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2020.mar.23 

POSETTI, J., BELL, E. et BROWN, P. (2020). Le journalisme et la pandémie. Un panorama mondial des impacts. Rapport élaboré par l’International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) et le Tow Center for Digital Journalism de l’Université de Columbia. https://www.icfj.org/sites/default/files/2020- 11/Journalism%20and%20the%20Pandemic%20Project%20Report%201%202020_French.pdf 

6 Voir par exemple : ANWAR, A., MALIK, M., RAEES, V. & ANWAR, A. (2020). Role of Mass Media and Public Health Communications in the COVID-19 Pandemic. Cureus, 12(9), e10453. https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.10453 

7 CHADWICK, A. (2013). The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Powers, New York, Oxford University Press. 

8 TAGMATARCHI STORENG, K. & DE BENGY PUYVALLÉE, A. (2021): The Smartphone Pandemic: How Big Tech and public health authorities partner in the digital response to Covid-19, Global Public Health, DOI: 10.1080/17441692.2021.1882530 

KITCHIN, R. (2020). Civil liberties or public health, or civil liberties and public health? Using surveillance technologies to tackle the spread of COVID-19, Space and Polity, 24:3, p. 362-381, DOI: 10.1080/13562576.2020.1770587