Power From the North: The Energized Trajectory of Indigenous Sovereignty Movements

Authors

  • Shirley Roburn McGill University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.22230/cjc.2018v43n1a3310

Keywords:

Berger Inquiry, Great Whale, Northern Gateway, Indigenous Legal Orders, Hydroelectricity, James Bay Project / Enquête Berger, Grande Baleine, Ordres Juridiques Autochtones, Hydroèlectricité, Projet de la Baie James

Abstract

Background  In the face of proposed energy megaprojects, First Nations and Inuit in Canada have organized locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally to articulate visions for their territories, which are anchored in self-determination, cultural resurgence, and harmonious relationships between human communities, non-human ones, and the land that sustains all beings.

Analysis  This article explores such articulations in response to three specific proposed energy projects: the Mackenzie Valley pipeline, the Great Whale hydroelectric project, and present-day efforts to bring tar sand oil and liquid natural gas (LNG) to tidewater in Northern British Columbia.

Conclusions and  implications  Indigenous nations have worked creatively and consistently to inflect decision-making concerning both the energy infrastructure, and the forms of governance that support it.

Contexte  Face aux propositions de mégaprojets énergétiques, les Premières Nations et Inuits du Canada se sont organisés localement, régionalement, nationalement et internationalement pour articuler des visions de leurs territoires ancrées dans l'autodétermination, la résurgence culturelle et les relations harmonieuses entre les communautés humaines les non-humains et la terre qui soutient tous les êtres.

Analyse  Inspiré par des recherches sur les ordres juridiques autochtones, cet article explore ces articulations en réponse à trois projets énergétiques précis: le projet d’olèoduc Mackenzie Valley des années 1970, le projet hydroélectrique Grande Baleine proposé pour le nord du Québec à la fin des années 1980; des efforts pour acheminer l'huile de sables bitumineux et le gaz naturel liquéfié (GNL) vers les côtes du nord de la Colombie-Britannique.

Conclusion et implications  Les nations autochtones ont travaillé de manière créative et constante pour influencer les décisions concernant l'infrastructure énergétique et les formes de gouvernance qui la soutiennent.Enquête Berger; Grande Baleine; Northern Gateway; Ordres Juridiques Autochtones; Hydroèlectricité, Projet de la Baie James

Author Biography

Shirley Roburn, McGill University

Shirley Roburn is a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University.

Published

2018-03-15