Editorial

Gertrude J. Robinson (McGill University)

As this issue goes to press, conference organizers are planning the schedule of the Canadian Communication Association's (CCA) ninth annual meeting and your editor is departing for New York City on a semester-long sabbatical. The CCA meetings will be held at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, from May 28-30, 1991. The meeting program, as usual, reflects the multiplicity of interests represented by Canada's communication scholars, a multiplicity which the Canadian Journal of Communication seeks to reflect. This issue on the economics of broadcast programming and the export chances of TV entertainment, planned by Colin Hoskins and Stuart McFadyen, from the University of Alberta's Department of Marketing and Economic Analysis, is a case in point.

In the two issues presented each year, we try to draw together and showcase researchers from different disciplines who ordinarily publish elsewhere. Their focus on communications-related issues enriches scholarship as a whole and builds links between individuals who may not have known about each other's existence. The two annual special issues are also designed as teaching tools to enrich the small number of Canadian-based textbooks available for communications courses. Bulk rates are available for 10 or more copies ordered through university bookstores or directly from Subscription Services, Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3C5, telephone: (519) 884-1970, ext. 2124. The application of the GST to books and magazines, a mistaken way to raise taxes, should perhaps be discussed in Kingston and lead to some concerted CCA-sponsored action by our association.

My Senior Resident fellowship at the Gannett Center for Media Studies, Columbia University, offers an opportunity to address two issues which have engaged my scholarly attention since my thesis research in Belgrade: Eastern European media and the intellectual foundations of our field. Paul Lazarsfeld's contribution with Robert Merton on the individual media effects theory and the Columbia Bureau's relationship with émigré scholars at the New School for Social Research will form one strand of my work in New York. The other will explore media democratization in Eastern Europe and benefit from conversations with three fellows from abroad. They are: Vitaly Korotich, editor of Moscow weekly Ogonyok, also member of the Soviet Congress of People's Deputies; Elena Androunas, senior research fellow at Moscow State University's Faculty of Journalism and Janos Horvat, senior advisor for Hungarian Television.

Together we shall explore the very different patterns of media democratization in the Soviet Union, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Poland and Yugoslavia. Membership on a panel at the IAMCR (International Association for Mass Communication Research) Congress in Bled, in August 1990, offered intriguing insights into the ways in which market forces and press freedom are being reconceptualized in the light of transnational European, North American and Japanese media developments. A 1992 journal issue might usefully be devoted to analyzing these issues.



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