Editorial

Gertrude J. Robinson (McGill University)

As this volume goes to press, many of you who are readers of the Canadian Journal of Communication will have attended the Learned Society meetings at Queen's University in Kingston. For those of you who were unable to attend, here is a brief account of the highlights of the Journal's Board and Subscriber meeting as well as the sessions scheduled by the Canadian Communications Association. The Board began its meeting by thanking the outgoing president Annie Méar (University of Montreal) and members Deirdre Grondin (University of New Brunswick) and Rowland Lorimer (Simon Fraser) for their service on behalf of the Journal. The following new appointments were unanimously approved: Claude Yves Charron (UQAM); David Mitchell (University of Calgary); Gail Valaskakis (Concordia); and Rowland Lorimer (Simon Fraser) who offered his services for a second term. Rowland Lorimer has since had to resign from the Board.

Donald Theall's treasurer's report noted the continued fragility of the Journal's financial base in the aftermath of the GST and rising production costs. Though a higher SSHRC grant will partially offset these costs, increases in subscription prices will probably have to be considered in the coming year. The Finance Committee will prepare a report for the Board's next meeting. Though the change-over to the Wilfrid Laurier University Press has caused publication delays, the Board unanimously congratulated the Press for the superior layout of the Journal. This year's final issue (Vol. 16, No. 3 /4) deals with political communication. For the 1992-93 period, volumes on "balance," "native communications," and "cultural analysis" are being planned. Please write to me, if you wish to submit a paper for any of these volumes. Both the Associate Editor and the Book and Media Review Editor are presently undertaking a readership survey to update the reviewer lists. Please write to Armande Saint-Jean or Jim Linton about your areas of expertise and willingness to contribute to the review process. Graduate students are welcome and encouraged to submit their names.

Immediately following my column in this issue, there is a message from Jim Linton, as the new Book and Media Review Editor, outlining his approach to the development of the Review section. I am very appreciative of Jim's willingness to take on the job for several years.

The Canadian Communication Association lectures and presentations were well attended and generated a great deal of interest. There was the usual plethora of panels and discussions, enlivened by a wine and cheese hosted by a number of Communication Departments and journals, including ours. These gatherings offer a welcome opportunity for exchanging professional and association news, and for meeting old friends. The Southam Lecture by Pierre Moeglin (University of Paris Nord) entitled "Turbulence in the International Mediascape" highlighted the profound changes in broadcast production and distribution which are resulting from the united Europe 1992 initiatives. Undoubtedly, these changes will further aggravate already visible industry fissures in Canada and North America.

This issue of the Journal presents eight articles covering three topics: "Politics, Culture and Canadian Communications." In the first group the Gordon Sinclair Student Essay by Lydia Zajc focuses on the knotty problem of the effect of ethnicity on political candidates. The study is interesting because it offers new operational methods for determining a riding's level of ethnicity and because it demonstrates that ethnic incumbents have a better than average chance of being selected and winning in heavily ethnic ridings. This suggests that in the future, as Canada's population mix changes, more ethnic candidates will be able to penetrate the previously closed party circles. Deirdre and Condé Grondin's essay on "the News Media as an Information Source for Active Party Members" validates Lazarsfeld's early research. It shows that active party members are also heavy media users and thus occupy an elite status in the social communication network. The T. A. Keenleyside and B. E. Burton paper "Of Mice and Monsignors: The Press and Canadian Policy Towards the Middle East" reaffirms the very sketchy attention the Canadian press pays to Middle East issues, except, as recent experience shows, in the case of a war.

Three further articles deal with a number of "cultural" issues which have been periodically covered by the Journal. Joël Demay's "Culture and Media Use in Saskatchewan's Indian Country" highlights the lack of relevance most Canadian media have for native communities. Stuart Surlin & Barry Berlin's "TV, Values and Culture in U.S.-Canadian Borderland Cities" continues work which demonstrates that shared perspectives outnumber viewer differences on both sides of the border while Serge Proulx's "The Videotext Industry in Quebec" highlights the difficulties of mass marketing telematics, a phenomenon which has also been recorded in other European countries. The two final articles deal with the rhetorical aspects of media messages and content, and demonstrate how both "advocacy" and "gender" structure the communicational situation. The Mills/Chiaramonte" Organization as Gendered Communication Act" is an insightful article which will enlarge and add further depth to our understanding of organizational practices (Vol. 15, No. 3/4). It deals with "gender" in a novel and insightful manner and provides useful evidence for many of us interested in the human context of communicational interactions.



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